FACT CHECK: No, Drinking Magnesium Citrate Cannot Prevent Or Cure Coronavirus

Jonathan Fonti | Fact Check Reporter

A post shared on Facebook more than 1,100 times claims drinking magnesium citrate can “kill” the new coronavirus and stop it from spreading.

Verdict: False

There is no scientific evidence that drinking magnesium citrate can prevent or cure the new coronavirus. The misuse of such laxative products can cause serious negative health effects.

Fact Check:

The internet has become replete with social media posts about alleged preventatives and cures for COVID-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus. This particular post claims consuming magnesium citrate can “kill” the new virus and stop it from spreading. (RELATED: Does Sunlight Kill Coronavirus?)

“As a medical professional I want to help as many people as possible in these hard times. If by any chance you feel sick or that you may of come in contact with Covid19,” reads the viral post. “1 bottle of this will kill the virus and stop it from spreading. IF MUST LEAVE YOUR HOUSE. DRINK A FULL BOTTLE PRIOR TO LEAVING !!! It will give you a few hours of a barrier.”

Magnesium citrate is a laxative used to treat constipation on a short-term basis and to empty the bowels before colonoscopies. The misuse of such laxative products can cause dehydration, electrolyte imbalances and bleeding, among other dangerous health effects, according to Brown University.

There is no scientific evidence that using magnesium citrate and other laxatives can prevent or cure the new coronavirus. Neither the World Health Organization (WHO) nor the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend magnesium citrate for such use on their respective websites. Experts have also warned the public that taking supplements and home remedies that have not been approved for preventing or treating COVID-19 by the Food and Drug Administration can cause serious negative health effects, according to The New York Times.

The CDC recommends thorough hand washing, social distancing and avoiding touching the eyes, nose and mouth, among other preventative measures, to reduce the risk of infection.

Jonathan Fonti

Fact Check Reporter
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