FACT CHECK: Did The Russian Embassy In Kenya Put Out This Press Release About Imported Sputnik V Vaccines?

Elias Atienza | Fact Check Reporter

An image shared on Facebook purportedly shows a press release from the Russian Embassy in Kenya talking about three companies overpricing Sputnik V COVID-19 vaccines in Kenya.

Verdict: False

There is no record of the Russian Embassy in Kenya publishing the press release. In statements on its website and social media accounts, the embassy labeled the document as “fake.”

Fact Check:

In early April, Kenya halted the private importation of COVID-19 vaccines, citing concerns about unlicensed shipments and potential for counterfeit shots, according to Reuters. Some Kenyans were charged up to $70 for a single dose of the Russian Sputnik V vaccine by private medical facilities, The New York Times reported.

An image circulating on Facebook claims to show a statement, allegedly from the Russian Embassy in Kenya, that calls out three companies for “over-charging of the vaccine prices.” The supposed press release, dated March 31, bears what appears to be a Russian coat of arms.

However, there is no record of the Russian Embassy in Kenya releasing the statement on its website or social media accounts. Check Your Fact also didn’t find any major media outlets reporting on the alleged statement. (RELATED: Does This Image Photo Show Vladimir Putin’s Daughter Receiving A COVID-19 Vaccine?)

The Russian Embassy in Kenya described the document as “fake” in a statement posted on its website, noting that the “only media sources” that the embassy uses to publish verified information on the issue are its website, Facebook page and Twitter account. The embassy also debunked the press release on its Facebook and Twitter accounts.

“We urge the Kenyan public to disregard any information surfacing in social media with reference to the Embassy, unless it is published through the above listed websites,” the Russian Embassy in Kenya said in the statement posted on its website.

Elias Atienza

Fact Check Reporter
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