FACT CHECK: Is A Photo ID Required To Buy Whipped Cream In New York, But Not To Vote?

Anna Mock | Fact Check Reporter

A post shared on Facebook claims a photo ID is required to buy whipped cream in New York.

Verdict: Misleading

A New York law requires a photo ID for the sale of whipped cream chargers, not the dispensers themselves. Citizens are still required to prove some sort of identification to register to vote.

Fact Check:

Multiple states have changed their voter and election laws since 2020, including voter ID and mail-in voting eligibility, according to Reuters. Opponents of voter ID have claimed such laws would not impact “vanishingly rare” voter fraud incidents, the outlet reported.

A Facebook post claims it is necessary to have a photo ID to buy whipped cream in New York, but not to vote.

“Welcome to New York…..where u now need a photo ID to buy Whipped Cream….but not to vote!!! God save us…..” the post reads.

In October 2021, a New York bill restricted the sale of these whipped cream chargers, also known as “whippits, whippets or whip-its” to people over 21, due to the presence of nitrous oxide and have proven to be a highly addictive way to get high. The text of the law, however, only requires consumers to present ID when buying chargers, not whipped cream canisters.

New York State Sen. Joe Addabbo tweeted a statement explaining that the sale of whipped cream canisters is still allowed. (RELATED: Viral Post Claims ID Is Required To Enter DC)

“There has been a misinterpretation of the language and intent of my bill,” his statement reads. “My bill is not intended to prevent people under the age of 21 from buying whipped cream dispensers, but the small, individual charger or cartridge inside the whipped cream canisters that is the target of this law.”

The second part of this claim is also incorrect, as New York residents are still required to present proper identification to register to vote, as can be seen in a voter registration form. There are no credible news reports to suggest such a requirement has been removed.

This is not the first time the topic of voting regulations have been the subject of misinformation online. Check Your Fact recently corrected a claim allegedly showing Georgia gubernatorial candidates Stacey Abrams and Brian Kemp arguing over purged voter registrations in a recent debate.

Anna Mock

Fact Check Reporter

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