FACT CHECK: Did Lego Unveil ‘Genderless Bricks’?

Brad Sylvester | Fact Check Reporter

An image shared on Facebook over 1,100 times claims Lego recently unveiled “new genderless bricks with no male/female connectors.”

Verdict: False

There is no record of Lego announcing “genderless” bricks. The claim originates from a satirical Babylon Bee article.

Fact Check:

The viral image shows what appears to be a May 20 news headline that reads, “Lego Unveils New Genderless Bricks With No Male/Female Connectors.” Below the headline is a smooth, rectangular block next to the Lego logo.

“This is the world we live in,” reads the image’s caption. (RELATED: Is Lego Pulling Its Police-Themed Toy Sets From Stores?)

While Lego did recently announce an LGBTQ pride flag-inspired “Everyone is Awesome” set that includes “11 monochrome minifigures each with its own individual hairstyle and rainbow colour,” there is no indication the toy maker has unveiled “genderless” bricks. The company has not published a press release about such bricks on its website or an announcement on its social media accounts.

An unveiling of “genderless” Lego bricks by the toy maker would also likely result in coverage from news outlets, yet no credible reports could be found.

“Although the image uses our logo and is made to look like an official LEGO product, this isn’t something we’ve created,” Lego spokesperson Jennifer MacDonald told Check Your Fact via email.

An internet search revealed the headline comes from a satirical article that was published by The Babylon Bee. On its “About Us” page, The Babylon Bee states it creates “satire about Christian stuff, political stuff, and everyday life.” While the screen grab on Facebook shows the headline, it does not include The Babylon Bee’s logo or note the headline’s satirical nature, which led some users to believe it was real.

This is not the first time social media users have shared inaccurate claims about Lego. Earlier this year, Check Your Fact debunked a viral claim alleging Lego had released a “Capitol Invasion” toy set two months before supporters of former President Donald Trump stormed the U.S. Capitol building on Jan. 6.

Brad Sylvester

Fact Check Reporter
Follow Brad on Twitter Have a fact check suggestion? Send ideas to [email protected]

Trending

FACT CHECK: Does AstraZeneca Mean 'Weapon That Kills'?
FACT CHECK: Did CS Lewis Once Write About How 'Many Souls' Can Be Brought To Hell By The 'Fear Of Getting Sick'?
FACT CHECK: Does This Image Show The 'Sleeping Lady' Mountain In Alaska?
FACT CHECK: Does This Photo Show An Antifa Activist That Trump Supporters Duct Taped To An Electrical Box?