FACT CHECK: Did The New York Times Publish An Article About Pfizer’s CEO Vowing To Rebuild The Georgia Guidestones?

Anna Mock | Fact Check Reporter

An image shared on Facebook purportedly shows a screenshot of an article from The New York Times titled “Pfizer’s CEO Vows To Re-Build The ‘Iconic’ Georgia Guidestones.”

Verdict: False

This screenshot is digitally fabricated. A spokesperson for The New York Times confirmed the outlet did not publish such an article.

Fact Check:

The Georgia Guidestones were a series of four connected granite slabs inscribed with cryptic messages, including one that calls for the human population to be capped at 500 million, located in Elberton, Georgia, according to The Washington Post. Part of the structure was destroyed by an explosion last week, prompting authorities to demolish the whole monument citing safety concerns, the outlet reported.

An image shared on Facebook claims the monument may soon be rebuilt. It shows what appears to be a screenshot of an article from The New York Times titled, “Pfizer’s CEO Vows To Re-Build The ‘Iconic’ Georgia Guidestones.”

“For more than four decades, the Georgia Guidestones have been an enigma,” the purported article’s subheadline reads. “On Wednesday, Pfizer’s CEO Albert Bourla agreed to finance its reconstruction, provided it could be completed by February 23, 2023. A mere six months, six weeks, and six days after the mysterious explosion in Georgia.”

“Look who wants to rebuild the guide stones,” reads text included in the image. (RELATED: Did Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla Refuse To Take His Company’s COVID-19 Vaccine?)

This screen grab is digitally fabricated, however. The story does not appear on The New York Times website or on the outlet’s verified social media accounts. There are likewise no credible media reports about Bourla suggesting he wants to rebuild the monument.

“That is a fabricated headline and subhead, which was not published by The New York Times,” said a spokesperson for The New York Times in an email to Check Your Fact.

This is not the first time misinformation involving Bourla has spread online. Check Your Fact recently debunked a viral post claiming Bourla said he wanted to reduce the human population by 50 percent by 2023.

Anna Mock

Fact Check Reporter

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