FACT CHECK: Does This Photo Show A Poster In Ireland Listing ‘Sudden Death’ As A COVID-19 Vaccine Side Effect?

Anna Mock | Fact Check Reporter

A photo shared on Instagram purportedly shows a poster from the Irish Health Executive Service (IHSE) listing “sudden death” as a side effect of the COVID-19 vaccine. 

 

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A post shared by Taryn Carroll (@ketotaryncarroll)

Verdict: False

The image is digitally fabricated. A spokesperson for the IHSE confirmed that no such poster was made by the organization.

Fact Check: 

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) identified a potential increased risk for people 65 and older who take the newest Pfizer booster, but assured it was “unlikely” to present a true risk, CNN reported.  The CDC and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) elaborated there was a potential connection between the vaccine and strokes in the age group, Politico reported.

An Instagram photo allegedly shows a poster from the IHSE stating that sudden death is a side effect of the COVID-19 vaccine. The post shares a photo of the alleged poster with red marks superimposed to draw attention to “sudden death” listed as a side effect. The image was also shared on Twitter, where it garnered over 500 retweets.

“To all who have come forward to receive their COVID-19 vaccinations, thank you for playing your part in keeping our community safe,” the alleged post reads. “Rare side effects have come to our attention.”

This is not a genuine poster, however. The typography and formatting used in the poster mimic the style of other informational COVID-19 posters from HSE, but it cannot be found in the organization’s archive of COVID-19 posters. (RELATED: Did The COVID-19 Vaccine Kill 80 Canadian Doctors?)

“I can confirm that this is not a real poster,” a HSE spokesperson told Check Your Fact through a direct message on Twitter.

The CDC lists the most common side effects from the COVID-19 vaccine and highlights severe allergic reactions could occur, but are rare. The agency reiterates the vaccines are safe and effective.

This is not the first time misinformation has spread online. Check Your Fact recently debunked a claim President Joe Biden twisted his face in disgust during a press conference.

Anna Mock

Fact Check Reporter

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